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Water Tanks You Want to Live In

Last year, we wrote an article that highlighted how old tanks are cleverly renovated into something completely different to extend its life and reduce trash.
 
And now a year later, the sustainability bug is still going strong as more and more architects and designers are making smart approaches to reusing old water tower structures and breathing new life into them.
 
Below is a collection of converted livable water tanks you want to live in.
 
Water Tower House
 
Two British designers took a 68-foot-tall water tower in East Germany into a gorgeous home. And the selling point is the 360-degree windows that showcase the stunning surrounding nature reserve.
 
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Chateau d’Eau in Steenokkerzeel, Belgium
 
This 100ft (30 meters) water tower in a Belgian village of Steenokkerzeel was built between 1938 and 1941. It was sitting unused for more than a decade when a businessman bought it and hired architecture firm – Bham Design in 2007 to convert the tower into a family home. Just wow.
 
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Tom Dixon
 
Tom Dixon converted a 5,000-gallon London water tower into a 21st Century home to become one of the most unique houses in London. The house has three floors, three bedrooms, a reception room, a kitchen, and a roof deck. Apparently, water from the Grand Union Canal will be used to heat and cool the structure.
 
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Woning Moereels
 
In Antwerp, Belgium, architect Jo Crepain took 17 years to transform a historic water tower into a modern and innovative six-story apartment building. The apartment is called Woning Moereels.
 
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House in the Clouds
 
As the name suggests, the House in the Clouds was once a water tower that was built in 1923 in Thorpeness, Suffolk, UK. It was made to look more attractive by enclosing it in a “house” floating above the tree line. And by 1979, the water tank was decommissioned and the water tank was removed after years of use. It now serves as what it actually looks like: A house floating above the tree line. It currently has five bedrooms and three bathrooms and has 68 steps from top to bottom. And if you’re ever near that area, make sure you book a room and spend a night or two in the House in the Clouds.
 
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TNphoto Tatsuya Nakagawa
Tatsuya Nakagawa is the VP of Marketing and co-founder of Castagra Products, a storage tank and wastewater coatings manufacturing company that is highly acclaimed for its sustainable coatings, cold weather tank coating applications, and its durable frac tank coatings. Castagra is used by the world’s top oil and gas field services companies.